Re: Tempey Cooley & Theodosia "Docia" & William Cunningham;

From: Bonnie & Craig Lillywhite <clillywhite_at_gmail.com>
Date: Wed, 30 May 2012 15:58:56 -0600

Jane White was born 26 Jun 1802 in Mercer County, KY. She died after 1880,
probably in Macon County, I don't think that James Cooley, her first
husband would have been that much younger than her. I have estimated his
birth at between 1796/1802. He died 1829 in Howard County. I have not found
the marriage but est 1817. Jane (Jennie) md Thomas Tuttle on 16 Apr 1833 in
Randolph County, MO. I find her in the 1870 and 1880 census of Macon
County, MO living w/her daughter, Alzada Roberts.
I may be wrong about this James but this is what I pieced together in the
70's and 80's from sources available then.

Has anyone been able to check out the American State Papers, Vol 15 that
mentions James being appt a 1st Lt under executive proceedings of the
Territory of MO, 20 Oct 1817? I don't know that it would get us more but it
might.

On Wed, May 30, 2012 at 3:28 PM, Michael Cooley <michael_at_newsummer.com>wrote:

> Jane, there was some discussion about this on the list a few months ago.
>
> First, that James was the son of Joseph seems to be the older of the two
> traditions. One of the Tallant letters that Dennis Young has scanned at
> http://www.eskimo.com/~day/cooley/docs/index.htm indicates that James was
> Joseph's son. (I'd have to dig to recall which one.)
>
> The other evidence is the elder James's estate records. It's generally the
> case that children were listed in the order of birth. That would make
> James M born c1808--too young to have married Jane White. (Other family
> group records have James born in 1808.) As far as I can tell, Dale was the
> first to make the assertion that he was James's son. I think he was just
> trying to put the pieces together with what info he had at the time. That
> he often changed his mind, depending on what he had found, is evident in
> his letters:
> http://ancestraldata.com/ahnentafel/256/PatWalker-letters.html
>
> And we know that Joseph had six children with his first wife. James was
> one of them, and was of the right age to have married Jane White.
>
> What is evident is that there were two James and that one of then died
> c1829 and four children:
>
> ..Nancy Cooley m Roberts
> ..Alzada Cooley m Roberts
> ..Demarcus Cooley, died young
> ..Henry Cooley, died young
>
> Someone born in 1808 would likely not have accomplished that.
>
> The other evident thing is that we don't know what happened to the other
> James, whichever one he was. I think I've found him. But there's a hole in
> the argument, one that will be difficult to clear up.
>
> Keep in mind who John's James was: a gambler, a drinker, a horse track
> owner, horse trader and possibly jockey. He was a slave owner and made an
> unsuccessful bid to run for office. And it seems he had moved a lot before
> finally settling in Missouri. His three eldest children were probably born
> in NC. Isaac is believed to have been born in Ohio. We know that Tink was
> born in KY. But what of James?
>
> James's son, Mathias, left MO for Arkansas and ended up in Jack county TX.
> Arriving there at about the same time was James Cooley born 1808/09 in PA.
> But here's the clincher: this James's descendant has the same yDNA as the
> Stokes county Cooleys. To sum up: he was the right age to have been James
> M Cooley, he is found living near James's brother in far off Texas, and he
> has the same Y chromosome.
>
> This is one of the reasons I've had such a great interest in PA Cooley DNA
> results. This James's birth place is consistent from one record to the
> next. He was definitely born in PA. So, the question is, was his father
> traveling and plying his trade, finally settling down when his children
> were too old and too numerous to be packing around the country? If Isaac
> was born in Ohio in 1805, it's very possible that James was in PA three
> years later.
>
> To date, four PA Cooley families have DNA-tested; none match, including
> Francis Cooley who lived in PA just over the border from Columbiana
> county, OH where James 1808 lived in the 1830s.
>
> Because all Cooley families of the era have not tested, we cannot yet know
> that anyone who matches John was a descendant of John's, but it's sure
> pointing in that direction. There certainly was no relationship between
> James of Columbiana and the closest Cooley family, Francis. That our James
> passed through PA seems plausible but it may be next to impossible to
> prove. All I can think of is newspaper items mentioning horse sales,
> races, race results, etc. But also note that nothing has turned up to
> place James in KY before 1810 and the birth of Tink. As I recall, he's not
> even on the census for that year. I think the family may have gathered
> there before the passing of John in 1811. (There's a gap for Edward in the
> tax record in Stokes county for the period.)
>
> Anyway, it all makes sense except for the PA birth part. Unfortunately,
> the James 1808 family has been as difficult to trace as Matthias's family.
> I think a lot of them went into the territories.
>
> -Michael
>
> > Thanks so much, Michael and Sandra for publishing these newsletters on
> this
> > list. I did not know they even existed. I plan to print them and add
> to
> > our familly history. My husband, Don descends from James Cooley and
> Jane
> > White. We have believed James was the son of James Cooley but my
> ancestors
> > were from James's brother Joseph. However, without proof we do not know
> which was James Cooley's father. I would think that Tink Cooley would
> have
> > known if that is the source for Dale Walker's information. I suspect
> this
> > is also where the Cooley researchers in Macon County, Mo. have conclued
> that
> > James is the father of James.
> > What a shame that in the 1970's my husband, Don managed the JC Penney
> store
> > in the very same area where Dale Walker lived.in St. Louis. However,
> we
> > had never heard of him at that time. He would have lived within blocks
> of
> > the store and it is possible he could have been a customer. My
> husband's
> > aunt, Mae Vass obit is in the newsletter. She was a sister to Don's
> mother
> > and both a Cooley and White descendant. Michael, you are surely making
> many
> > easy trails for future Cooley researchers. Thank you so much. Michael,
> also there are several Cooley researchers in Macon area and if you have
> some
> > clues as to why you feel James is the son of Joseph, please share
> because
> > we
> > know mistakes are made and anytime we can make corrections, it is a wise
> thing to do.
> > Jane and Don Wisdom
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Michael Cooley" <michael_at_newsummer.com>
> > To: "John Cooley Mailing List" <undisclosed.recipients_at_johncooley.net>
> Sent: Wednesday, May 30, 2012 2:10 PM
> > Subject: Re: Tempey Cooley & Theodosia "Docia" & William Cunningham;
> >> Thanks for this, Mary. After years of searching I finally found Jim
> Terry
> >> a few months ago. He said that he did his research a very long time ago
> and was unable to answer any of my questions. He didn't seem much
> interested in the newer information I could provide. My principal
> concern
> >> at the time was establishing the parentage of the James Cooley who
> married
> >> Jane White. He states in his charts that James was Joseph's child
> rather
> >> than Jameses child, which is what a lot of people have today. I think
> that's based on Dale Walker's placement. I have a reason to want to put
> James with Joseph. :)
> >> If I recall, Sandy Stanton has the Tempy thing straightened out. I
> don't
> >> recall quite what she wrote, though. Hopefully, she's monitoring the
> list.
> >> :)
> >> Are you aware that Sandy helped me put together Dale Walker's "Cooley
> Cousins?" I've put it together at
> >> http://ancestraldata.com/ahnentafel/256/cooleycousinsnewsletter/ -- Now
> that I know how to create and manipulate PDF files, I'll put together
> an
> >> all-in-one version. Sandy is missing some of the later editions. Would
> you
> >> have any of them?
> >> Have you heard from Tom Alexander lately? He contributed a few posts to
> the earlier manifestation of the list.
> >> -Michael
> >>> I am confused as to the marriage record for Tempey Cooley:
> >>> Missouri Marriage Records, 1805-2002
> >>> Name: Tempey Cooley
> >>> Marriage Date: 4 Feb 1819
> >>> Marriage County: Howard
> >>> Spouse Name: William Cuningham
> >>> Theodosia?????s Father James Cooley?????s will in ?1822/1824 lists
> Docia &
> >>> William
> >>> Cunningham as heirs.
> >>> Joseph Cooley had a daughter named Tempey Cooley ????? so I thought
> the
> >>> marriage
> >>> for Tempey Cooley & William Cunningham was Joseph?????s
> daughter...Does
> >>> this
> >>> above marriage mean that Theodosia ?????Docia????? was also called
> ?????Tempey?????? OR Did
> >>> Docia & Tempey both marry William Cunningham???
> >>> This information was in a file sent to me by Charles Cooley. Tom
> >>> Alexander is the owner & researcher of the file - and he gave his
> permission
> >>> to share the file, "I would be glad for you to share the information
> on
> >>> our
> >>> family with anyone who is interested."
> >>> From the file:
> >>> "The following is an article published in "Early Days in the West
> Along
> >>> the
> >>> Missouri One Hundred Years Ago" by Judge Joseph Thorp. It was
> published
> >>> in
> >>> 1924 and I found it at the Mid Continent Public Library in Kansas
> City,
> >>> MO
> >>> -
> >>> Call Letter 977.8T 398:
> >>> WEDDING UNDER A TREE
> >>> We were not behind in matrimonial alliances and sometimes a little
> >>> romance
> >>> connected with them. A daughter of Joseph Cooley and a Mr. White
> engaged
> >>> to
> >>> blend their two lives in one, and they called on Elder Thorp to
> celebrate
> >>> the nuptial bonds, and my recollection is that it was very agreeable
> to
> >>> their friends. They concluded to make a big thing of it, and gave
> general
> >>> invitation; no house being sufficient to hold the guests, they
> repaired
> >>> to
> >>> the shade of a large white oak tree not far from Fort Cooper, and
> there
> >>> the
> >>> marriage ceremony was performed, and the two pronounced one. She is
> still
> >>> living and is with one of her granddaughters in Buchanan or Platte
> County
> >>> as
> >>> I informed.
> >>> Her sister married Peter Wrightsman, late of our county (Clay).
> The
> >>> famous Dr. Cooley of Kansas City is a brother's son. Cooley's Lake is
> familiar to everybody in Clay; it took its name from the family. So
> much
> >>> for one wedding."
> >>> [note from me, Mary Cooley: I found Peter Wrightsman, who is
> >>> buried in Mount Zion Cemetery in Mosby, Clay Co., MO:
> >>> Name: P. Wrightsman
> >>> Death Date: 01 Sep 1866
> >>> Age: about 69 years old
> >>> Clay County, Missouri Cemetery Records, Volume II
> >>> Mount Zion Graveyard
> >>> ...but when I go to Find A Grave this is the information found there:
> Peter Writesman
> >>> Birth: 1799; North Carolina, USA
> >>> Death: Sep. 1, 1866; Fishing River Township, Ray County, Missouri,
> USA
> >>> Spouse: Mary Writesman (____-1866)
> >>> Children:
> >>> Thomas H. Writesman (1828 - 1899)
> >>> Nancy Ann Writesman Levi (1829 - 1915)
> >>> Amanda Jane Writesman Field (1832 - 1879)
> >>> Information under daughter Nancy Ann Writesman is this:
> >>> Nancy Ann "Masy" Writesman Levi
> >>> Birth: Apr. 24, 1829; Clay County, Missouri, USA
> >>> Death: Sep. 10, 1915; Clay County, Missouri, USA
> >>> Nancy was the daughter of Peter and MARY POLY OFFICER Writesman -
> buried
> >>> next to her husband James W. Levi.
> >>> {another discrepancy of the Judge Joseph Thorp's account: Dr. Cooley
> of
> >>> Kansas City was a half-brother to Elizabeth Cooley White.]
> >>> BACK to the information provided by Tom Alexander:
> >>> "The following is an article titled Elizabeth Cooley White by Jim
> Terry.
> >>> As
> >>> far as I know it was not published and I don't know who Jim Terry is.
> This
> >>> unpublished manuscript was given to me by Ron Jones of Grants Pass,
> Oregon
> >>> who is a direct descendant of Joseph Cooley who married Keziah Cooley
> and
> >>> then from Christopher Columbus Cooley, a brother of Elizabeth Cooley
> White:
> >>> Elizabeth Cooley was born in or about 1794 on Oldfield Creek in
> >>> Stokes
> >>> County, North Carolina. She was the third of six children born to her
> mother (name unknown) and had three sisters and two brothers: Mary
> (about
> >>> 1791), John (Oct 8, 1793), James (about 1796), Hannah (about 1799) and
> another sister (Name unknown about 1801). Her father Joseph Cooley,
> was
> >>> a
> >>> simple farmer not possessed of much worldly wealth.
> >>> Elizabeth and her sisters learned domestic tasks in the home while
> >>> their
> >>> brothers learned about planting, harvesting and the care of livestock
> from
> >>> their father. The girls mastered the techniques of the clank-timbered
> loom;
> >>> learned to 'swingle' flax; card wool and spin as well as mending.
> There
> >>> were lessons in butter, soap and sugar making; cooking on an open
> fireplace
> >>> and baking in an out door oven. Molding candles and casting bullets
> were
> >>> also just a few of things Elizabeth was probably taught in her youth.
> >>> At an early age, Elizabeth was taken by her parents to Goose Creek
> >>> in
> >>> Green County, Kentucky -- about 1799 -- and they remained in the Blue
> Grass
> >>> state. 'In my 11th year, death visited our family and claimed my
> mother
> >>> for
> >>> its victim, leaving six children, I being the third child,' she
> reminisced.
> >>> 'Notwithstanding, I summed up sufficient courage to take charge of the
> children which were younger than myself. I had to fill the place of
> both
> >>> a
> >>> mother and a sister. I spun and made clothes for them and tried, in
> my
> >>> childish way, to teach them the ways of Truth and Life.'
> >>> Elizabeth's mother had died about 1805, but on Feb. 10, 1807, her
> >>> father,
> >>> Joseph Cooley, remarried Keziah Casey in Lincoln County, KY. An
> infant
> >>> half-sister, Evaline Cooley was born on December 7, 1807, followed by
> a
> >>> baby
> >>> half-brother, Christopher Columbus Cooley, on August 6, 1809.
> >>> Then in the spring of 1811, when Elizabeth was 17 years old, the
> >>> Cooley
> >>> family made the arduous trek from Kentucky to the vast Louisiana
> Territory
> >>> and settled temporarily on Loutre Island on the Missouri River in what
> is
> >>> now Montgomery County, Missouri. But the real threat of Indian
> attacks
> >>> made
> >>> a move to a more defensible area imperative. The Cooley's and other
> families on the edge of the frontier wilderness soon moved upriver to
> Boone's Lick Country, where Daniel Boone and his sons manufactured
> salt.
> >>> 'Elizabeth recounted, 'My father's wagon was the first that ever
> >>> marked
> >>> the road. We had to cut our road and make our own bridges.' When the
> Cooley's reached Boone's Lick, their first tasks were to plant corn
> and
> >>> build a cabin. Elizabeth added, 'We lived without bread from October
> (1811)
> >>> until corn would grist.'
> >>> The pioneer's claim to the land was tenuous, since Boone's Lick
> >>> Country
> >>> was still inhabited by Indians and settlement was not yet sanctioned
> by
> >>> the
> >>> government -- Missouri, had not yet been organized as a territory. In
> the
> >>> spring of 1812, raids by the Sauk and Fox tribes left several settlers
> dead
> >>> and the Cooley's abandoned their homestead for safety. 'We lived in
> peace
> >>> one year,' said Elizabeth, 'then we had to fort for protection.'
> >>> The Cooley's took refuge at Fort Hempstead. Elizabeth explained,
> >>> 'We
> >>> forted {off and on} four years {during the War of 1812}, then peace
> was
> >>> made...Daniel Boone was the head commander of our fort. He and his
> two
> >>> sons
> >>> were the first males that were ever in the state of Missouri. He was
> here
> >>> two years before I came to the state.' This was a real "stretcher" --
> in
> >>> actuality Ben Cooper was the fort's commander. However, the young Kit
> Carson (Boone's grandson), did reside in the stockade with the
> Cooley's.
> >>> (Daniel Boone was some 80 years old at the time and lived near St.
> Charles.)
> >>> It was during the war that two additional children were added to
> the
> >>> Joseph Cooley family: Cassandra (born about 1812) and Harrison (born
> about
> >>> 1814). Something else was astir also: Elizabeth was courted by
> William
> >>> White, a handsome young man with light hair, steel gray eyes and lean
> six
> >>> foot frame. The records of St. Charles, Missouri, show that William
> and
> >>> Elizabeth were married on July 3, 1813, by the Reverend David McLain,
> the
> >>> Baptist preacher at the fort. The wedding festivities evidently
> carried
> >>> over into the next day.
> >>> Elizabeth remembered, 'I was married under a large oak tree on the
> >>> Fourth
> >>> of July at the first picnic ever held in Missouri to William White. I
> cooked my own wedding dinner; my bread was beat in a mortar; my meats
> were
> >>> wild meats of all kinds.' She also recounted, 'My wedding suit was
> not
> >>> as
> >>> some might think -- it was not homespun, neither was it a pin-back.
> But
> >>> it
> >>> was cut to suit the times...There were no pin-backs worn by our
> mothers
> >>> them
> >>> days. The people in the fort had no room for such pin-backs.' If
> true
> >>> to
> >>> the time, a raucous 'shivaree' followed at night.
> >>> In August, 1813, William and Elizabeth preempted 160 acres on
> >>> Sulpher
> >>> Creek adjoining Joseph Cooley's farm. 'In settling the new counties
> {Missouri was now an official territory}, all that were large enough
> to
> >>> hold
> >>> a line had to help build houses and clear,' Elizabeth said. 'I have
> spun
> >>> thread out of nettles all day, then piled burn brush until midnight.
> If
> >>> anyone thinks I haven't done enough for my country, well, tell them
> what
> >>> I've done.'
> >>> Elizabeth raised a large family. Boasting, she said, 'We raised 11
> >>> children all to be grown. They are all alive but three.' Her
> children
> >>> born
> >>> in Howard County included: Nancy (1816), Mary Ann, called Polly
> (1818),
> >>> Harvey (1820) and Tempy (1822). About 1825, Elizabeth and William
> resettled
> >>> in Clay County, Missouri, along with the Joseph Cooley family, and
> took
> >>> a
> >>> farm in Fishing River Township near Cooley Lake (subsequently drained
> for
> >>> additional farmland). Here the remainder of Elizabeth's children were
> born:
> >>> Margaret (about 1825), Elizabeth (1830), Susan (1832), William (1836)
> and
> >>> John (1838).
> >>> 'We lived 12 years in Howard County', Elizabeth added, 'then moved
> >>> to
> >>> Clay County, then to Andrew County, then back to Clinton County, which
> is
> >>> now my home {1878}. When Platte County was settled, my oldest
> daughter
> >>> and
> >>> I were the first white females that were ever in that county.' Her
> father,
> >>> Joseph Cooley, died April 3, 1826.
> >>> In his declining years, William White eventually needed constant
> >>> care
> >>> and
> >>> attention due to failing mental faculties -- possibly Alzheimer's.
> This
> >>> once dynamic and active man could barely feed himself. He applied to
> the
> >>> government for a military pension, but the information he provided was
> confused and in error. The government turned him down. He died
> January
> >>> 12,
> >>> 1875 in Stewartsville, Missouri, leaving Elizabeth a widow.
> >>> Speaking to the editor of the Liberty Tribune in August 1878,
> >>> Elizabeth
> >>> closed her story, 'I am now in my 88th year. My husband and I lived
> together for 64 years. He was then taken from me. We raised 11
> children.
> >>> Is there anyone of this day that can say they have seen two of their
> fourth
> >>> generation? I have of mine: children, grandchildren, and great
> grandchildren, and great great grandchildren are now in number, 146.'
> I will look through Ron Jones information that I have and see if I can
> discover who Jim Terry is/was. It is very possible that I don't have
> that
> >>> part of Ron's research.
> >>> I hope this makes some sense...I am half asleep!!!
> >>> Good night all!
> >>> Mary Cooley
> >>> --
> >>> <a href="http://newsummer.com/distlist">distlist 0.9</a>
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> information.
> >> --
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>
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Received on Wed May 30 2012 - 15:59:01 MDT

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