Re: John Cooley (Joseph, John Sr.) , Salt Works

From: Michael Cooley <michael_at_newsummer.com>
Date: Sat, 22 Oct 2011 13:37:09 -0700

The source may have been John Cooley's grandson, Arthur M. Kiergan. In a
1930s letter to Mildred Tallant he said that John "was murdered in his own
horse lot in Mason [Macon?] in about 1845." The letter can be found at
http://www.eskimo.com/~day/cooley/docs/Kiergan%20Arthur%20M%20-%201932-05-30.pdf

-Michael

> The following information was supplied by Nancy Meadows, cemetery finder
> for
> Randolph and neighboring counties in Mo. Nancy is trying to find the
> burial place for John Cooley near Burton Station, in Howard County, Mo.
> We
> know he was murdered but do not know any details. She also supplied the
> information that John's wife, Elizabeth White Cooley, supposedly buried in
> the Mark Teter Cemetery near Jacksonville,(Randolph County) Mo. had no
> stone. The stones found in the cemetery were moved to Huntsville, Mo.
> Cemetery when the coal mine bought the land in that area.
> Jane Wisdom
>
>
> "History of Howard and Cooper counties, Missouri"
>
> On Judge McCafferty's land, in east half of southwest quarter
>
> section 16, township 51, range 15, there is an old lick which is known
>
> as Cooley's lick. Mr. McCafferty states that salt was first made here
>
> fifty or sixty years ago, and that John Cooley made salt at the lick in
>
> 1841. He says he first saw the spring in that year, and at that time
>
> there were trees growing up from old stumps that he judged to be thirty
> years old. According to Mr. McCafferty's calculations, salt must have been
> made here as far back as 1811. Mr. Cafferty has owned the lick for
> twenty-five years and made salt in 1862, using the few remaining kettles
> that were first used fifty or sixty years ago. He was unable to state how
> much water was required to make a bushel of salt, but says that in making
> a
> bushel he burned four cords of wood. At one time he would obtain more salt
> from a certain amount of water than at another. The water has a sulphurous
> smell, and leaves and pieces of wood left in the spring are soon covered
> with a yellowish-white coating.
>
> --
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> information.
>
Received on Sat Oct 22 2011 - 14:37:09 MDT

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