[List] Fw: Re: Thomas Kirkland White Cooley

Sandra Stanton sandystanton at prodigy.net
Mon May 7 08:54:34 PDT 2007


I just sent an email to someone in Randolph county, Mo
who will do look-ups in the microfilm newspapers of
Randolph county. I am hoping that it is indexed as I
don't have when this article was published. If anyone
has a date when this appeared in the Moberly
Monitor-Index please let me know.

Do you think that someone changed the full-blooded
Englishman to Dutchman, so he would fit in with the
Dutch Cools of New York?

Sandy
--- michael at newsummer.com wrote:

> Hi Mary,
> 
> You may know that Don Cooley and Sandra Stanton are
> first (I think) cousins of
> Dale's. (It's my understanding that Dale died some
> years ago.) It could very
> well be that they have a copy of this but I'm
> forwarding it on.
> 
> Well, looking at some of the stuff that Don and
> Sandy have sent to me I see
> this paragraph:
> 
> "John was a full blooded Englishman and when he
> first came to this part of
> the country, he settled near the present site of
> Kansas City, at Cooley's
> Lake.  He later moved to Boonville, MO (Old
> Frankline).  Both died in
> Randolph Co.  Elizabeth is buried in the Mark Teter
> graveyard about 5 miles
> west of Jacksonville, MO.  John ran the salt works
> at Burton Station in
> Howard County: he was murdered and is buried in a
> cemetery in Burton
> Station. John COOLEY and Elizabeth WHITE were
> married on 2 Jun 1816 in ,
> Howard, Missouri, USA."
> 
> You have esserntially the same paragraph below but
> it says he was full-blooded
> Dutchman. Do you know which version is correct?
> 
> Thanks,
> Michael
> 
> On Sun, 6 May 2007 17:02:48 -0700, Mary Cooley wrote
> > I found it in Bernita Jones Sharp's papers, which
> I have on loan 
> > from her nephew's widow.  I thought that I had
> sent this to the 
> > Cooley list - I guess not.  Bernita had
> typewritten on top of the 
> > page:  "This article sent to me by Dale "Pat"
> Walker of St. Louis 
> > (1982).  Pat is a descendant of both the Cooley
> and White families.  
> > Hi is property manager for the Missouri-Pacific
> Railroad.  We met he 
> > and his mother Maureen Cooley Walker in 1979 when
> we were in St. Louis."
> > 
> > This is the story as typed by myself:
> > 
> > "Joseph Cooley - His Story 
> > By himself
> > As appeared in the Moberly Monitor-Index
> > 
> > (Editor's Note:  Archie Cooley, 716 No. Morley, is
> the great grand 
> > nephew of Joseph COOLEY, who was a prisoner of war
> during the Civil 
> > War.  COOLEY said that when he was a child he
> visited Joseph COOLEY, 
> > who lived at Excello then.  The Moberlyan has
> provided the Monitor-
> > Index with the following story, prepared by the
> late Joseph COOLEY,
> >  about his life and the times of the 1800s.)
> > 
> > 'I was born in Randolph County, Mo., about halfway
> between 
> > Huntsville and the early settlement known as
> Darksville.  My father 
> > was William COOLEY.
> > 
> > My Mother was Elizabeth FIELDS, a native of
> Kentucky, but I do not remember
> > the County from which she came, nor can I remember
> hearing her 
> > mention any town that might indicate the part of
> Kentucky in which 
> > the family had lived. She was an orphan and was
> brought to Missouri 
> > when she was two years old.
> > 
> > William Cooley, my father was born August 19,
> 1818, in the town of 
> > Old Franklin.  He was the son of John COOLEY, and
> his wife Elizabeth 
> > WHITE.  My grandmother, Elizabeth WHITE COOLEY,
> was a sister to Tom 
> > WHITE and she had another brother (and as I
> remember his name, it 
> > was Tant or Rant WHITE.)
> > 
> > Sheriff James W. WHITE of Macon County was a
> cousin to my father, William
> > COOLEY.  My grandmother, Elizabeth WHITE COOLEY,
> is buried in the 
> > Mark TETER graveyard about 5 miles west of
> Jacksonville, Missouri.
> > 
> > My grandfather John COOLEY ran the salt works at
> Burton Station in Howard
> > County; he died there and is buried there in a
> near-by cemetery.
> > 
> > Capt. CRAWLEY, who was a lawyer at Keytesville,
> told me that my
> > great-grandfather COOLEY was named Joseph COOLEY,
> but if he told me 
> > the name of my great grandmother, I cannot
> remember it.
> > 
> > My grandfather COOLEY was a full-blooded Dutchman
> and when he first 
> > came to this part of the country, he settled near
> the present site 
> > of Kansas City, at COOLEY's Lake and from there he
> moved back to old 
> > Franklin.  I do not know exactly when my
> grandfather COOLEY moved to 
> > Old Franklin, but he was living there in 1818,
> when my father, 
> > William COOLEY, was born Aug. 19, 1818.
> > 
> > I was born Aug. 4, 1843 in Randolph Co., MO.  Of
> course, I remember
> > incidents prior to the time that I was six years
> of age, but 
> > beginning at the time I was six years old, in the
> year of 1848, I 
> > have a very vivid recollection of things that
> happened.  In the year 
> > of 1848 my father and mother moved to Adair Co.,
> MO and lived about 
> > six miles south of where Kirksville now stands. 
> It was here that I 
> > went to my first school; my teacher was a Miss
> BAITY or BEATTY.  I 
> > do not remember who owned the land on which we
> lived at that time, 
> > but know it did not belong to my father.
> > 
> > In the spring of 1849, we moved to Milan, Mo.  My
> Mother's brother, Uncle
> > Samuel FIELDS, lived there.  I think my Mother
> also had a cousin 
> > that may have lived near there.  It was the year
> of the gold fever 
> > in California and my uncle wanted to go.  He had
> my father move over 
> > there and help him wind up his business and run
> the mill and the 
> > post office.
> > 
> > He had been running the post office there in
> Milan.  Father ran the post
> > office in the house in which he lived.  I can well
> remember the 
> > seals on the letters.  That was the day before the
> postage stamp was 
> > introduced.  Stamps looked very strange to us when
> the first ones 
> > came into use and it was quite a while before
> folks became 
> > reconciled to the innovation.  In those days all
> the letters were 
> > sealed with wax; in fact they had no envelopes as
> they do now.
> > 
> > We lived at Milan one year and moved back to
> Kirksville in 1850, and 
> > lived there until Nov. 1853.  We lived on the farm
> of Dr. GOOD, a 
> > quarter of a mile North of where the resent
> courthouse stands.  It 
> > was while we lived there that I earned the first
> money of my life.
> > 
> > I worked in the field all day dropping corn by
> hand for a man, while 
> > he covered with a hoe.  When night came he gave me
> a dime.  I was 
> > very much elated over the possession of so much
> money and as soon as 
> > I could get away that evening I went down to the
> store, which was 
> > only a quarter mile away, to spend my earnings of
> the day.  Of 
> > course, the store kept open in the evenings while
> the neighbors came 
> > in to learn the news, buy their few necessities
> and smoke and 
> > exchange yarns.  After much deliberation I spent
> my earnings of that 
> > day, the first money I had ever earned, for a
> Jew's Harp.
> > 
> > The first plowing that I ever did in my life was
> in a field between 
> > where we lived and the present site of the
> courthouse in Kirkville.  
> > In the fall of 1853 the surveyors made their first
> survey for the 
> > line of the North Missouri Railroad.  They came
> right through our 
> > corn field, running from South to North.  My
> father thought we would 
> > stop the survey through our field but he soon
> learned it was no use. 
> >  The surveyors cut several rows of corn right
> through our field and 
> > threw it to the side.
> > 
> > When we first moved to that place there was no
> courthouse in Adair County.
> > I can well remember seeing the first one built, it
> was in 1853 and 
> > as I was a boy I was around there a great deal
> when they were 
> > working on it; it was a large frame building.  I
> think this 
> > courthouse burned during the Civil War.
> > 
> > We lived in a small house on Dr. GOOD's place, and
> I can well 
> > remember a few of the folks who lived near.  They
> were Dr. GOOD, Ben 
> > HORTON, Mrs. JAMES and her children and Whitley
> FOSTER.
> > 
> > One thing that I remember that now seems strange
> to me was that as a 
> > boy I frequently went fishing on Foster's Prairie
> there were holes 
> > of water over this prairie and we caught a good
> many fish, of course 
> > they were small.  It puzzles me now to think how
> the fish got in 
> > those water holds on the prairie, however, I can
> remember how many 
> > of them got out.
> > 
> > My Uncle, Tom COOLEY, married Ben HORTON's sister.
>  He hauled goods from
> > Edina to Kirksville when he was not fishing and my
> father often 
> > helped him. I do know my father helped haul from
> there to Kirksville.
> > 
> > In November 1853, my father moved his family from
> Kirksville to 
> > Dalton, MO. We lived on the Bowling Green Prairie.
>  In the fall of 
> > 1853 my father bought land, paying $4.50 an acre
> for it-the price 
> > that all land around there was selling.  There
> were one hundred 
> > acres of prairie and thirty-six acres of timber in
> the place.
> > 
> > At the time that we moved from Kirksville to
> Bowling Green Prairie in
> > Chariton County the trip was made in three days. 
> The first day the 
> > fire was on the prairie and in the field.  We
> fought fire nearly all 
> > day, that night we stayed North of Bloomington. 
> The second night we 
> > stayed at my grandmother COOLEY's, a mile east of
> the Chrisman 
> > school house.  She was very ill at the time and
> died within a few 
> > days.  That is my only recollection of her, the
> only time that I can 
> > remember seeing her.  The third day we reached our
> destination in 
> > Chariton County and moved in with Uncle Joe
> COOLEY.
> > 
> > Joseph COOLEY had a large two-room log house with
> a hall between the 
> > rooms, commonly called a double log house.  We had
> plenty of room as 
> > he had only six in his family and father had nine,
> we lived with 
> > Uncle Joe until the next spring.  Uncle Joe moved
> to his farm and 
> > Uncle Tom COOLEY moved in with us.  My father went
> to making rails 
> > and we boys gathered the corn and stripped
> tobacco.  Then my father 
> > built a house on the land he bought.  We moved in,
> broke the sod and 
> > cut and made cottonwood rails to fence our 100
> acre farm.
> > 
> > We raised corn and tobacco, put out about 8 acres
> of tobacco every 
> > year we lived there.  We would get about $8.00 a
> hundred for the 
> > tobacco, and the corn brought from 10 cents to 25
> cents per bushel.  
> > The ground was especially adapted to raising
> potatoes.  One time we 
> > raised about 400 bushel, but we had no market for
> them, sold some at 
> > 10 cents a bushel and fed many to hogs, and just
> threw the potatoes 
> > over the fence to the hogs.
> > 
> > We went to school at the Bluff School which was 2
> miles across the prairie
> > from our home.  We did not get to go very regular
> as we had to strip 
> > tobacco and gather corn.  We had good teachers,
> Alfred MANN and M. 
> > J. BEBEE.
> > 
> > We kept this up until 1860 when George JAMES and
> myself got a job cutting
> > cord wood and making rails.  We started Jan. 1,
> 1860 and worked 30 
> > days and made $60 apiece and it certainly made me
> feel big.  That 
> > fall I joined the Baptist Church at Bluff Point. 
> Our pastor was 
> > Rev. Thomas ALLEN; I was baptized by him in the
> Missouri River 2 
> > miles south of Keytesville Landing. I think all
> the others who were 
> > baptized at that time are all dead.
> > 
> > General Sterling PRICE was a close neighbor of
> ours.  In the year of 
> > 1861 my brother, John Samuel COOLEY, went into the
> Southern Army 
> > under Gen. PRICE. In 1863 I was drafted in the
> Brunswick Militia 
> > under Col. Wm. MOBERLY.  I stayed in it 6 months;
> my pay was $25 per 
> > month.  I was sent to Mexico, Missouri under Capt.
> John.  I stayed 
> > there two weeks and came home.
> > 
> > My Father had paid me out and I was free again. 
> In the year of 1863 
> > I raised 2 acres of tobacco and got it out in
> time, for on Aug. 16,
> >  1863 there came a killing frost.  In 1864 we
> prized that tobacco 
> > very much and sent it to E. M. SAMUEL of St.
> Louis; we got $9.00 per 
> > hundred for the lugs and $27.00 per hundred for
> the good tobacco.  
> > The event cost me $4.00 - I had 14 acres of corn
> and was offered 
> > $500 in greenbacks for it, but the militia got it
> all and I got nothing.
> > 
> > The first of September, 1863, we got into a
> skirmish just below 
> > Brunswick, near the Warden School house.  There
> was a steamboat, the 
> > Federals and only six of us, but did not known it.
>  We were talking 
> > with Mr. PENNINGTON, he was in a two horse wagon
> when our men got to 
> > shooting and his team ran off. The Federals went
> into Brunswick 
> > where they took the boat down the River and got to
> Glasgow where 
> > they were captured the next day by PRICE.
> > 
> > Several companies crossed the Missouri River in a
> boat pulled by two 
> > horses. They aimed to get with PRICE that night
> but it took us most 
> > all day.  He was fighting at Independence, we did
> not get into the 
> > fight until the next day then we got the worst of
> it, but we did not 
> > know it.  Several men were killed.
> > 
> > We marched South by the way of Carthage, Missouri,
> then went 8 miles 
> > East of Fort Scott, Kansas, and got into another
> fight.  We were 
> > fairly successful in that fight but lost a few
> men.  Our commander 
> > was Gen. John B. CLARK of Fayette, Missouri.  We
> marched in peace to 
> > Newtona but there the Federals came up again but
> Joe SHELBY got his 
> > "dander up" and made them take back track.
> > 
> > We went to Cane Hill and crossed the Arkansas
> River at Bogies 
> > between Fort Smith and Fort Gibson.  It took the
> army an entire day 
> > to cross the river, the Federals intended to get
> us while we were 
> > crossing the Arkansas, but PRICE made a forced
> march of over 60 
> > miles in one day so beat them to it.
> > 
> > We only had beef left for rations, no salt or
> bread.  We kept this 
> > up for 3 days, got a little beef and started out
> to hunt something 
> > more to eat, there were 9 of us.  My Father led
> the crowd.  We swam 
> > the Arkansas and got upon the ridge, and went into
> camp.
> > 
> > We got up the next morning wondering where to go;
> we saw a spy and started
> > towards him and the Federals came over the hill. 
> We only had two pistols
> > for we were so weak that we could not carry our
> guns.  They sent us 
> > to Fort Smith.  We were sure weak and we had not
> had anything to eat 
> > for 3 days and nights but one hickory nut and one
> bunch of grapes.
> > 
> > We got to Fort Smith, Ark. the 13th day of
> November, 1864.  We never 
> > saw a railroad or crossed a bridge.  We crossed
> the Arkansas in a 
> > flat boat and when we landed in Fort Smith we
> found 132 other 
> > prisoners there.  They had several quarters of
> beef in the boat and 
> > I ate all the tallow off one hind quarter, my
> father tried to get me 
> > to quit eating it.  He said it would kill me.
> > 
> > All of our men got sick but we had been there only
> two days when the
> > Federals hitched 40 of us to a government wagon
> and sent us to the hills
> > after a load of wood.  We cut and loaded a cord
> and pulled it back 
> > to our camp.  We could buy a quarter of beef for
> 60 cents, but bread 
> > and coffee were short.
> > 
> > We paid $50.00 in greenbacks for a sack of flour
> and paid $1.50 for 
> > a pound of coffee and boiled the coffee grounds
> twice.  My father 
> > got sick.
> > 
> > In a few days we got orders to march.  The
> Arkansas River was low 
> > and we crossed it in a ferry boat, it struck a
> sand bar and we had 
> > to wade out.
> > 
> > I carried my father on my back to the bank, I led
> him 3 or 4 miles,
> >  we went into camp.  The next day father could
> walk without anyone 
> > leading him.  We got within 6 miles of Fort Gibson
> and met a 
> > commissary wagon train from Fort Leavenworth with
> 1000 guards, 
> > nearly all Indians.  We got out about 6 miles and
> found a cabin, 
> > went into camp there, that night there was a 9
> inch snow.
> > 
> > The next morning, Uncle Tom COOLEY broke out with
> the smallpox.  
> > They gave us a government wagon and 5 yoke of
> cattle to pull it.  We 
> > started for Ft. Leavenworth.  We had to stay a
> quarter of a mile 
> > behind the regiment. Myself and Andy PERKINS drove
> the team, father 
> > waited on Uncle Tom COOLEY for father had had the
> smallpox in light 
> > form, commonly called variloids.
> > 
> > In a day or so Uncle William FIELDS took the
> smallpox.  They were 
> > all put n our wagon.  Wm WELCH was the next to
> take sick and then 
> > Uncle John BANTA and Ely SARTON.
> > 
> > We got to Horse River and Uncle Tom COOLEY died,
> we dug a hole and 
> > put him in it, placed some large rocks on the
> grave.  We went on and 
> > it rained and sleeted all day, we had to haul two
> big logs under a 
> > wagon and make a fire. In a few days Uncle Wm.
> FIELDS died, after he 
> > died we had to haul him all day and got within 15
> miles of Ft. 
> > Scott.  We dug a hole and roped him up in some
> blankets, and threw 
> > some dirt on him.
> > 
> > We went on to Fort Scott and stayed all night. 
> The next morning 
> > they kept my father and the sick there.  I went on
> to Fort 
> > Leavenworth.  Jesse GRAN was the only one that got
> sick.  He died in 
> > Ft. Leavenworth.  We got there Christmas Eve,
> 1864.
> > 
> > At Fort Leavenworth they kept us in one room,
> about 135 of us, only 
> > part of us could lie down at a time.  On Jan. 1,
> 1865 we crossed the 
> > Missouri River and got in a passenger car to St.
> Joseph, Missouri, 
> > then they loaded us into a hog car to Macon,
> Missouri.  We stayed 
> > there all night and the next morning we got in a
> passenger car for 
> > the Gratoit Prison in St. Louis.
> > 
> > Two weeks later my father, Ely SARTON, Uncle John
> BANTA and myself 
> > went to trimming lamps and lanterns.  I got fat. 
> My Mother sent me 
> > a box of good things to eat.  It was on the road
> for 30 days and 
> > part of it was spoiled. We gave part of it to our
> hungry friends.
> > 
> > We stayed in St. Louis until the 1st of April,
> then they loaded us 
> > on the top of a steamboat, and took us to Alton,
> Illinois.  They 
> > kept us on the trot and we played ball and town
> ball and only had to 
> > work a little.
> > 
> > One man got a finger shot off trying to get out
> and two men tried to 
> > dig out but failed.  That was planned by a man
> from this country.  
> > Two men got in coffins to be taken out, but they
> also failed.  One 
> > was Joe TERRY from Randolph County.  I stayed
> there until the 11th 
> > of May and I was released. I went to the shops to
> get a job but they 
> > could not handle me.  I started up the road
> towards Jerseyville, 
> > Illinois and tried to hire to the farmers but they
> did not want a tramp.
> > 
> > I came to an inn, and stayed all night, struck out
> towards 
> > Philadelphia and met a man going, a Mr. STUMP of
> Alton.  He asked me 
> > what I could do on a far.  I told him that I could
> do anything, but 
> > they had machines I did not know how to hitch to. 
> That was Friday 
> > and he told me to grub timber until he got back;
> that was my first grubbing.
> > 
> > On Monday morning I hired to him for a dollar a
> day and board and washing.
> > I got $2.75 a day for 9 days in the harvest.  I
> worked until the 5th 
> > of July, and started to Jacksonville, Missouri.  I
> stayed with 
> > Robert SKINNER and then went to Father's at the
> GODDARD place.  He 
> > gave me two acres of tobacco and some corn; I
> could have made more 
> > in 20 days in Illinois.
> > 
> > On Dec. 7, 1865, I married Rhoda Jane RICE, near
> Darksville, 
> > Missouri.  We lived with Father during the year of
> 1866 and then 
> > went to the HALL place near Darksville.  In 1869,
> I went to the 
> > ROBERTS farm.  In November 1869, I bought the
> CHRISTAL Farm near 
> > Cairo, Missouri.  In 1870 I went into the
> organization of the 
> > Baptist Church at Pleasant Hill Church.  I was
> ordained a deacon.  I 
> > raised corn and tobacco and ran a coal bank.  On
> Oct. 8, 1877, I 
> > joined the I.O.O.F. Lodge at Cairo, Missouri, and
> I still belong to the
> > lodge.
> > 
> > On Jan. 13, 1878, I sold my place and bought the
> WHITE farm, moved 
> > there and stayed 5 years and bought a farm near
> Eccles.  I ran a 
> > farm and a coal mine. My wife died Feb. 1, 1911. 
> I stayed by myself 
> > and did my own cooking and housework for two
> years.  In 1913 I 
> > married Sally COULTER.  In 1915 I moved to
> Excello, Missouri and I 
> > moved my church letter to the Mt. Salem Baptist
> Church.
> > 
> > I still cut my own wood and raise a large garden
> of fine vegetables 
> > and get around without any trouble at all.'"
> > 
> > [Bernita Jones Sharp added this - "This article
> sent to me by Dale "Pat"
> > Walker of St. Louis (1982).  Pat is a descendant
> of both the Cooley and
> > White families.  He is property manager for the
> Missouri-Pacific Railroad.
> > We met he and his mother Maureen Cooley Walker in
> 1979 when we were 
> > in St. Louis.]
> > 
> > Notes added by Bernita on reverse sides of
> article:
> > .	William Cooley & Eliz Fields were married 30
> April 1840 - Howard
> > Co., MO per IGI files.
> > .	Thomas White married Jemima Cooley
> > .	Tant or Rant - probably Randolph Harrison White
> > .	I have been to Old Franklin Burton Station 1979
> > .	Joseph Cooley referred to as his great
> grandfather, the same Joseph
> > Cooley that is my second great grandfather.  
> > .	He refers to his grandfather, John Cooley as
> being a "full-blooded
> > Dutchman".
> > .	5. Archie Cooley, son; 4. Wm. Cooley, Father; 3.
> John Cooley,
> > Grandfather; 2. Joseph Cooley, great grandfather;
> 1. John Cooley
> > .	Have been to Cooley Lake
> > .	Dr. Goode, relative of Pat Walker of St. Louis
> who has furnished
> > much info to me on the Missouri Cooleys.  Met
> "Pat" Dale Walker 1979 
> > in St. Louis .	Mrs. James & her boys - "Jesse
> James" .	Thomas Cooley,
> >  son of John & Eliz White Cooley
> > 
> > Are you sure that you don't have this?
> > 
> > Mary
> > 
> > -----Original Message-----
> > From: michael at newsummer.com
> [mailto:michael at newsummer.com] 
> > Sent: Sunday, May 06, 2007 4:36 PM
> > To: Mary Cooley
> > Subject: RE: [List] Fw: Re: Thomas Kirkland White
> Cooley
> > 
> > This is fabulous, Mary. Do you recall where you
> found it or the date 
> > of the story?
> > 
> > Thanks,
> > Michael
> > 
> > On Sun, 6 May 2007 15:52:02 -0700, Mary Cooley
> wrote
> > > I think that the best that I have is the story
> that Joseph Cooley wrote.
> > > Joseph Cooley was a s/o William Cooley &
> Elizabeth Jane Fields.  
> > > William Cooley was a s/o John Cooley & Elizabeth
> White.
> > > 
> > > "My Uncle, Tom COOLEY, married Ben HORTON's
> sister.  He hauled goods 
> > > from Edina to Kirksville when he was not fishing
> and my father often 
> > > helped him. I do know my father helped haul from
> there to Kirksville."
> > > 
> > > "Joseph COOLEY had a large two-room log house
> with a hall between the 
> > > rooms, commonly called a double log house.  We
> had plenty of room as 
> > > he had only six in his family and father had
> nine, we lived with Uncle 
> > > Joe until the next spring.  Uncle Joe moved to
> his farm and Uncle Tom 
> > > COOLEY moved in with us.  My father went to
> making rails and we boys 
> > > gathered the corn and stripped tobacco.  Then my
> father built a house 
> > > on the land he bought.  We moved in, broke the
> sod and cut and made 
> > > cottonwood rails to fence our 100 acre farm."
> > > 
> > > ..."The next morning, Uncle Tom COOLEY broke out
> with the smallpox.  
> > > They gave us a government wagon and 5 yoke of
> cattle to pull it.  We 
> > > started for Ft. Leavenworth.  We had to stay a
> quarter of a mile 
> > > behind the regiment. Myself and Andy PERKINS
> drove the team, father 
> > > waited on Uncle Tom COOLEY for father had had
> the smallpox in light 
> > > form, commonly called variloids."
> > > 
> > > "We got to Horse River and Uncle Tom COOLEY
> died, we dug a hole and 
> > > put him in it, placed some large rocks on the
> grave.  We went on and 
> > > it rained and sleeted all day, we had to haul
> two big logs under a 
> > > wagon and make a fire. In a few days Uncle Wm.
> FIELDS died, after he 
> > > died we had to haul him all day and got within
> 15 miles of Ft.
> > > Scott.  We dug a hole and roped him up in some
> blankets, and threw 
> > > some dirt on him."
> > > 
> > > Mary
> > > 
> > > -----Original Message-----
> > > From: list-bounces at johncooley.net [mailto:list- 
> > > bounces at johncooley.net] On Behalf Of
> michael at newsummer.com Sent:
> > > Sunday, May 06, 2007 2:32 PM To:
> list at johncooley.net Subject: [List]
> > > Fw: Re: Thomas Kirkland White Cooley
> > > 
> > > Does anyone have the proof that Thomas K W
> Cooley was the son of John 
> > > Cooley
> > > (1793-1844) and Elizabeth White?
> > > 
> > > Thanks,
> > > Michael
> > > 
> > > ---------- Forwarded Message -----------
> > > From: michael at newsummer.com
> > > To: "Daryll Cooley"
> > > Sent: Sun, 6 May 2007 14:26:57 -0700
> > > Subject: Re:
> > > 
> > > Hi Daryll,
> > > 
> > > I've seen the book online at
> NewEnglandAncestors.org but it looks like 
> > > it now requires membership in order to view it.
> I acquired it once 20 
> > > years ago via Inter Library Loan. A lot of
> genealogy libraries have a 
> > > copy.
> > > 
> > > I'll forward this on to the John Cooley mailing
> list but I'd recommend 
> > > you sign up for it yourself: list.johncooley.net
> -- or I can do it for 
> > > you. In any case, I'll let you know what I find
> out.
> > > 
> > > -Michael
> > > 
> > > On Sun, 6 May 2007 14:48:27 -0500, Daryll Cooley
> wrote
> > > > Michael,
> > > > 
> > > > I'm stuck, I can't seem to connect, with any
> vital records, Thomas 
> > > > Kirkland White Cooley to his "father" John
> Cooley (10/8/1793-c1844).
> > > > Any help would be appreciated. Also, I'm
> hearing about the book 
> > > > below
> > > > - Where can I get it?
> > > > 
> > > > The Cooley Genealogy by Mortimer Elwyn Cooley
> > > > 
> > > > Thanks-
> > > > Daryll
> > > 
> > > --
> > > ------- End of Forwarded Message -------
> > > 
> > > --
> > > 
> > > _______________________________________________
> > > List mailing list
> > > List at johncooley.net
> > >
> http://lists.johncooley.net/mailman/listinfo/list
> > 
> > --
> 
> 
> --
> 
> 



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